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Episode 1: The Microservices.

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Microservices

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17.06.2021 Agenda

Start: 5 PM CEST / 8 AM PDT / 11 AM EDT time
Where: Online event

Your system started small. Then grew bigger and more complex. Now you’re having trouble keeping separate concerns really separate, the code becomes spaghetti, refactoring is a nightmare, and deployments become risky. You’re not delivering value to your customers fast enough or as fast as you used to.
It might be time to switch to Microservices. You're browsing the web, and all it does is generating more questions.

We will try to answer some of them on this event.

Time (pm CEST time) Topic Speaker
5 PM CEST / 8 AM PDT / 11 AM EDT - 5:10  Opening Tomasz Bogus, Scalac
Head of Business
5:15 - 5:45

Should start-ups be using microservices?

The most obvious advantage of using Microservice architecture is horizontal scalability, which is perfect for fast growing companies.

Early stage start-ups on the other hand, do not initially need scalability, and so the general wisdom is that they should not use microservice architecture, as it can introduce complexity too early on in a company's life cycle: you do not want to build a super scalable feature that no one will ever use!

Up until now, the general advice was to instead start building a monolith, and to then refactor to microservices once there is a notable increase in your products demand and therefore the need to start scaling. However, in practice, the refactoring stage can break a company.

I would argue that the availability of accessible cloud infrastructures, new industry practices and programming frameworks, allows start-ups, when building their pre-scale up products from a clean sheet, to opt for microservice architecture over starting with a monolith.

Today it's easier to build microservices than ever before, we can build high-quality products with fast-time-to-market, implement easy feature iterations, and exploit the ability to scale fast.

Zuka Kakabadze, Fugo.ai
CEO
5:50 - 6:20

How to secure Microservices 

The word "Microservices" is an overloaded word in the current Cloud-Native computing era.  The concept it brings appears to be very noble: having a decentralized system in which all of the components are loosely-coupled, which gives a lot of autonomy and flexibility to each individual microservice, and, at least theoretically, the light-weight approach should help with the agility of the system as a whole.  In reality, however, a lot of things can go wrong with such an approach, especially when the system is not being implemented and executed correctly.  This talk discusses the importance of understanding the nature of what Microservices is, and the key points to consider when switching from a "legacy" system (such as SOA) to a Cloud-Native Microservices ecosystem, and what would be needed in order to successfully implement a Microservices system.  While there would always be technical challenges when performing any major "paradigm shift" on the system level, of equal importance - if not more - is the need for the organization to be prepared well for the culture shift as well.

Lukasz Marchewka, Scalac
Consultant
6:25 - 6:55

The Hype and the Hope of Microservices

Microservices. Some love them. Some hate them. But one thing cannot be denied: they have forever altered the way behemoths such as Amazon and Netflix architect, develop, maintain, deploy, and operate large-scale distributed software systems.
 
In this short talk by John A. De Goes, you'll get a chance to learn and reflect on where microservices came from, what they offer that other architectures do not, and how both current and future technology choices can help mitigate some of the drawbacks that come from modernizing legacy Enterprise software with cloud-native microservices designs.
John De Goes, Ziverge
CEO
7:00 - 7:30

Battle Tested, Event-Driven Patterns for your Microservices Architecture

During the past couple of years I’ve implemented or have witnessed implementations of several key patterns of event-driven messaging designs on top of Kafka that have facilitated creating a robust distributed microservices system at Wix that can easily handle increasing traffic and storage needs with many different use-cases. 

In this talk I will share these patterns with you, including:
* Consume and Project (data decoupling)
* End-to-end Events (Kafka+websockets)
* In memory KV stores (consume and query with 0-latency)
* Events transactions (Exactly Once Delivery)

Natan Silnitsky, Wix
backend-infra engineer
 
7:35 - 8:05

Microservices Design Patterns

There are many ways to design patterns for building microservices, and most of them are wrong. Actually, that is not true. The fundamental objectives for implementing microservice systems are speed and agility. Speed, of course, is how quickly you can get things done. Regardless of what design patterns you use, if you can quickly build, fix, enhance, and rapidly evolve your microservices, you are heading in the right direction. Agility is the flexibility to move rapidly across the entire development lifecycle while living happily in production.

But we can always do better. Right?

That is what this talk is about. We will take a look at some of the more common microservice design patterns. And we will compare them to some of the alternatives. For example, what is the more common microlith design pattern, and how getting serious about loose coupling guides the evolution to ways that increase your speed and agility? We will also look at why it is micro at the code level and the data level. Finally, we will cover some practical guidelines, such as why your microservices should do the least amount of work while your users are waiting and techniques for doing that.
 
Hugh McKee, Lightbend
Developer Advocate
8:10 - 8:40

From desktop to cloud, a journey

Optrak4 first saw service as an all-desktop Java application in 2003. Optrak5, a polyglot mix of Scala, Typescript and Rust will launch on the cloud later this year. This talk will describe the journey, taking in, along the way, big balls of mud, event sourcing and various dead ends including the realisation that just enough can be too much.

Tim Pidgen, Optrak
CEO
8:45 - 9:15

Is Microservices the Silver Bullet?

The word "Microservices" is an overloaded word in the current Cloud-Native computing era.  The concept it brings appears to be very noble: having a decentralized system in which all of the components are loosely-coupled, which gives a lot of autonomy and flexibility to each individual microservice, and, at least theoretically, the light-weight approach should help with the agility of the system as a whole.  In reality, however, a lot of things can go wrong with such an approach, especially when the system is not being implemented and executed correctly.  This talk discusses the importance of understanding the nature of what Microservices is, and the key points to consider when switching from a "legacy" system (such as SOA) to a Cloud-Native Microservices ecosystem, and what would be needed in order to successfully implement a Microservices system.  While there would always be technical challenges when performing any major "paradigm shift" on the system level, of equal importance - if not more - is the need for the organization to be prepared well for the culture shift as well.

Mary Grygielski, IBM
Developer Advocate
9:20 - 9:50

Apache Pulsar - The Next Generation Messaging and Queuing System

Apache Pulsar is the next generation messaging and queuing system with unique design trade-offs driven by the need for scalability and durability. Its two layered architecture of separating message storage from serving led to an implementation that unifies the flexibility and the high-level constructs of messaging, queuing and light weight computing with the scalable properties of log storage systems. This allows Apache Pulsar to be dynamically scaled up or down without any downtime. Using Apache BookKeeper as the underlying data storage, Pulsar guarantees data consistency and durability while maintaining strict SLAs for throughput and latency. Furthermore, Apache Pulsar integrates Pulsar Functions, a lambda style framework to write serverless functions to natively process data immediately upon arrival. This serverless stream processing approach is ideal for lightweight processing tasks like filtering, data routing and transformations. In this talk, we will give an overview about Apache Pulsar and delve into its unique architecture on messaging, storage and serverless data processing. We will also describe how Apache Pulsar is deployed in use case scenarios and explain how end-to-end streaming applications are written using Pulsar.

Karthik Ramasamy, Splunk
Senior Director of Engineering managing the Pulsar team

9:50 - 10:00 Closing Tomasz Bogus, Scalac
Head of Business

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Speakers

Tomasz Bogus, Scalac

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Tomasz Bogus, Head of Business at Scalac. Tech entrepreneur, startup co-founder. For over 15 years, he has worked with more than 1000 successful companies, and helped them achieve faster growth by embracing newest IT technologies.

John De Goes, Ziverge

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A mathematician by training but a software engineer by vocation, John A. De Goes has been professionally writing software for more than 25 years. John has contributed to dozens of open source projects written in functional programming languages, including ZIO, a library for asynchronous and concurrent programming in functional Scala. In addition to speaking at Strata, OSCON, BigData TechCon, NEScala, ScalaWorld, Scala IO, flatMap, Scalar Conf, LambdaConf, and many other conferences, John also published a variety of books on programming. Currently, John heads Ziverge Inc, a company committed to solving hard business problems using the power of functional programming.

Mary Grygielski, IBM

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Mary is a Senior Developer Advocate at IBM with the Liberty/Websphere team, focusing on Liberty, Microprofile, Jakarta EE, Java, Open Source, Cloud, and Distributed Systems. She started as a software engineer in the 90’s with Unix/C, and transitioned to Java around 2000, and has never looked back since then. She considers herself as a polyglot and loves to continue learning new and better ways to solve real-life problems. She is an active tech community builder outside of her day job, and currently the president of the Chicago Java Users Group (CJUG), as well as a co-organizer for several IBM-sponsored meetup groups in the Greater Chicago area.

Zuka Kakabadze, Fugo.ai

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Zuka, CTO of Fugo - a digital signage content management software. A software engineer and a computer scientist by day (and night actually). After completing a MSc in Computer science at Oxford in 2013, Zuka founded and worked on various tech start-ups, with one succesful exit. He is passionate about Scala, Functional Programming, and Machine Learning.

Lukasz Marchewka, Scalac

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Now Consultant at ScalaC, previously Software Developer for more than 12 years. During his career helped 10+ companies deliver high quality software. His expertise covers architecture, system designs, FP, DDD. Privately, enjoys riding a bicycle. 

Hugh McKee, Lightbend

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Hugh McKee is a developer advocate at Lightbend. He has had a long career building applications that evolved slowly, inefficiently utilized their infrastructure, and were brittle and prone to failure. Hugh has learned from his past mistakes, battle scars, and a few wins. And the learning never stops. Now his focus is on helping other developers and architects build resilient, scalable, leading-edge systems. Hugh frequently speaks at conferences around the world. He is the author of Designing Reactive Systems: The Role Of Actors In Distributed Architecture.

Natan Silnitsky, Wix

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He is on the Data streaming team in charge of building event driven libraries and tools on top of Kafka and ZIO.
Before that he was part of a task force that was responsible for building the next generation CI system at Wix on top of Google's Bazel build tool.
 
Has many years of experience as a developer of large scale web services - First in .Net, later in Scala.
 
Natan's passions include clean and functional code, dev velocity and great software design.

Tim Pidgen, Optrak

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Tim Pigden is CEO of Optrak Distribution Software Ltd – a UK-based provider of Vehicle Routing Software. He is a Fellow of Operational Research Society and Chartered Institute for Logistics and Transport and splits his working time between programming in Scala, managing a development team, logistics consultancy and dreaming up better ways to solve real-world (aka “Rich”) Vehicle Routing Problems.

Karthik Ramasamy, Splunk

Karthik Ramasamy is a Senior Director of Engineering managing the Pulsar team at Splunk. Before Splunk, he was the co-founder and CEO of Streamlio that focused on building next generation event processing infrastructure using Apache Pulsar and led the acquisition of Streamlio by Splunk. Before Streamlio, he was the engineering manager and technical lead for real-time infrastructure at Twitter where he co-created Twitter Heron. Twitter Heron was open sourced and used by several companies. He has two decades of experience working with companies such as Teradata, Greenplum, and Juniper in their rapid growth stages building parallel databases, big data infrastructure, and networking. He co-founded Locomatix, a company that specializes in real-time streaming processing on Hadoop and Cassandra using SQL, which was acquired by Twitter. Karthik has a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Wisconsin, Madison with a focus on big data and databases. During his college tenure several of the research projects he participated were later spun off as a company acquired by Teradata. Karthik is the author of several publications, patents, and a popular book "Network Routing: Algorithms, Protocols and Architectures".

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Top 3 reasons to go for Microservices according to Martin Fowler and Sam Newman

  1. Zero-downtime independent deployability
  2. Isolation of processing around data (GDPR, right to be forgotten)
  3. Enable a higher degree of organisational autonomy (use microservices to reflect the organisational structure)

Why Scalac?

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Team Extension and IT Project Development:
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We mix domain and technical knowledge to meet the project goal. We conduct a smart discovery session to make sure the team has the perfect set up for you.

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Development speed boost in 24h

Scalac developers’ expertise, agile processes, and service-oriented culture minimise the inherent unpredictability of software delivery. We are experienced in remote working - we can support you in a process of transition to this kind of work.

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Happiness Warranty

If in the first week of our engagement we do not get to the right speed on your project - you can resign, and you won't be billed. In the corona-times we are  keen on extending the one-day notice to longer period even when rump-up time is over.

Delivering exceptional tech skills, with a lot of empathy

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We delivered solutions to over 80 clients all around the world. From startups to global organizations. We’ve got teams that specialize in different technologies and areas to address your challenges from every angle. We can help you if you need a consultation to move forward with your project, team extension to get rid of bottlenecks or a team to build your dedicated solution. 

Tomasz Bogus, Head of Business at Scalac

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